The Gluten Free Girl - Specializing in Gluten Free Diets
 
 
Safe List - Foods & Ingredients Safe for a Gluten-Free Diet
 
Acacia Gum
Acorn Quercus
Adipic Acid
Adzuki Bean
Acacia Gum
Agar
Alfalfa
Algae
Algin
Alginate
Allicin
Almond Nut
Aluminum
Annatto
Annatto Color
Apple Cider Vinegar
Arabic Gum
Arrowroot
Artichokes
Aspartame (can cause IBS symptoms)
Aspic
Ascorbic Acid
Astragalus Gummifer
Baking Soda & Powder (check)
Balsamic Vinegar
Beans
Bean, Adzuki
Bean, Hyacinth
Bean, Lentil
Bean, Mung
Bean Romano (Chickpea)
Bean Tepary
Benzoic acid
Besan
Betaine
BHA
BHT
Beta Carotene
Biotin
Butter (check additives)
Butylated Hydroxyanisole
Butyl Compounds
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium Caseinate (Contains MSG)
Calcium Chloride
Calcium Disodium
Calcium Phosphate
Calcium Silicate
Calcium Stearate
Calcium Sulfate
Camphor
Canola Oil
Caprylic Acid
Carageenan Chondrus Crispus
Carboxymethylcellulose
Carnauba Wax
Carob Bean
Carob Bean Gum
Carob Flour
Carrageenan
Casein
Cassava Manihot Esculenta
Castor Oil
Cellulose
Cellulose Gum
Cetyl Alcohol
Cheeses
- (check ingredients)
Chestnuts
Chickpea
Chlorella
Chymosin
Citric Acid
Collagen
Corn Meal
Corn Flour
Cornstarch
Corn Syrup
Corn Syrup Solids
Corn Swetener
Cortisone
Cotton Seed Oil
Cowitch
Cowpea
Cream of Tartar
Cysteine, L
Demineralized Whey
Desamidocollagen
Dextrose
Dioctyl Sodium
Eggs
Elastin
Ester Gum
Fish (fresh)
Flaked Rice
Flax
Folic Acid-Folacin
Formaldehyde
Fructose
Fruit (including dried)
Fumaric Acid
Gelatin
Glutamate (free)
Glutamic Acid
Glutamine (amino acid)
Glycerides
Glycerol Monooleate
Glycol Monosterate
Glycol
Glycolic acid
Gram flour (chick peas)
Grits, Corn
Guar Gum
Hemp
Herbs
Honey
Hyacinth Bean
Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrolyzed soy protein
Iodine
Inulin
Invert Sugar
Kasha (roasted buckwheat)
Keratin
Kudzu Root Starch
Lactic Acid
Lactose
Lanolin
Lecithin
Lentil
Lipase
Locust Bean Gum
Magnesium Carbonate
Magnesium Hydroxide
Maize Maize Waxy
Malic Acid
Maltitol
Manioc
Masa
Masa Flour
Masa Harina
Meat (fresh)
Methyl Cellulose
Microcrystallin Cellulose
Milk
Milo
Mineral Oil
Mineral Salts
Monosodium Glutamate MSG (made in USA)
Monopotassium Phosphate
Mung Bean
Musk
Niacin-Niacinamide
Nuts (except wheat, rye & barley)
Nut, Acron
Nut, Almond
Oils and Fats
Oleyl Alcohol/Oil
Paraffin
Peas
Pea - Chick
Pea - Cow
Pea Flour
Pepsin
Peru Balsam
Petrolatum
Phenylalanine
Pigeon Peas
Polenta
Polyethylene Glycol
Polyglycerol
Polysorbates
Potassium Citrate
Potassium Iodide
Potassium Sorbate
Potatoes
Potato Flour
Prinus
Pristane
Propolis
Propylene Glycol
Propylene Glycol Monosterate
Propyl Gallate
Psyllium
Pyridoxine Hydrochloride
Rennet
Reticulin
Rice
Rice Flour
Rice Vinegar
Romano Bean (chickpea)
Rosin
Royal Jelly
Sago Palm
Sago Flour
Saifun (bean threads)
Scotch Whisky
Seaweed
Seeds (except wheat, rye & barley)
Seed - Sesame
Seed - Sunflower
Sphingolipids
Soba (be sure it's 100% buckwheat)
Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate
Sodium Alginate
Sodium Ascorbate
Sodium Benzoate
Sodium Caseinate
Sodium Citrate
Sodium Erythrobate
Sodium Hexametaphosphate
Sodium Lauryl Sulfate
Sodium Nitrate
Sodium Phosphate
Sodium Silacoaluminate
Sodium Stannate
Sorbic Acid
Sorbitol-Mannitol (can cause IBS symptoms)
Sorghum Flour
Soy
Soybean
Soy Lecithin
Spices (pure)
Stearates
Stearamide
Stearamine
Stearic Acid
Subflower Seed
Succotash (corn and beans)
Sucrose
Sulfosuccinate
Sulfites
Sulfur Dioxide
Sweet Chestnut Flour
Tallow
Tapioca
Tapioca Flour
Tarrow Root
Tartaric Acid
TBHQ is Tetra or Tributylhydroquinone
Tea
Tea-Tree Oil
Teff Flour
Tepary Bean
Thiamine Hydrochoride
Tofu-Soya Curd
Tolu Balsam
Tragacanth
Tragacanth Gum
Tri-Calcium Phosphate
Turmeric (Kurkuma)
Tyrosine
Urad/Urid Beans
Urad/Urid Dal (peas) Vegetables
Urad/Urid flour
Vanillin
Vitamin A (retinol)
Waxy Maize
Whey
White Vinegar
Wine Vinegars (& Balsamic)
Wild Rice
Xanthan Gum
Yam Flour
Yogurt (plain, unflavored)
 
 
 
 
Forbidden List - Foods and Ingredients Not Safe for a Gluten-Free Diet(List found on www.celiac.com) Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
 
 
Abyssinian Hard (Wheat triticum durum)
Amp-Isostearoyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Barley Grass (can contain seeds)
Barley Hordeum vulgare
Barley Malt
Beer
Bleached Flour
Blue Cheese (made with bread)
Bran
Bread Flour
Brewer's Yeast
Brown Flour
Bulgur (Bulgar Wheat/Nuts)
Bulgur Wheat
Cereal Binding
Chilton
Club Wheat (Triticum aestivum subspecies compactum)
Common Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Couscous
Dextrimaltose
Disodium Wheatgermamido Peg-2 Sulfosuccinate
Durum wheat (Triticum durum)
Edible Starch
Einkorn (Triticum monococcum)
Emmer (Triticum dicoccon)
Farina Graham
Filler
Fu (dried wheat gluten)
Germ
Graham Flour
Granary Flour
Groats (barley, wheat)
Hard Wheat
Hydrolyzed Wheat Gluten
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Pg-Propyl Silanetriol
Hydrolyzed Wheat Starch
Hydroxypropyltrimonium Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Kamut (Pasta wheat)
Malt
Malt Extract
Malt Syrup
Malt Flavoring
Malt Vinegar
Macha Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Matzo Semolina
Oriental Wheat (Triticum turanicum)
Pasta
Pearl Barley
Persian Wheat (Triticum carthlicum) Poulard Wheat (Triticum turgidum)
Polish Wheat (Triticum polonicum)
Rice Malt (if barley or Koji are used)
Rye
Seitan
Semolina
Semolina Triticum
Shot Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Shoyu (soy sauce)Small Spelt
Soba Noodles
Soy Sauce
Spelt (Triticum spelta)
Sprouted Wheat or Barley
Stearyldimoniumhydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Strong Flour
Suet in Packets
Tabbouleh
Teriyaki Sauce
Textured Vegetable Protein - TVP
Timopheevi Wheat (Triticum timopheevii)
Triticale X triticosecale
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Flour Lipids
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Extract
Triticum Vulgare (Wheat) Germ Oil
Udon (wheat noodles)
Vavilovi Wheat (Triticum aestivum)
Vegetable Starch
Certain Vitamins/supplements
Wheat, Abyssinian Hard triticum durum
Wheat Amino Acids
Wheat Bran Extract
Wheat, Bulgur
Wheat Durum Triticum
Wheat Germ Extract
Wheat Germ Glycerides
Wheat Germ Oil
Wheat Germamidopropyldimonium Hydroxypropyl Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein
Wheat Grass (can contain seeds)
Wheat Nuts
Wheat Protein
Wheat Triticum aestivum
Wheat Triticum Monococcum
Wheat (Triticum Vulgare) Bran Extract
Whole-Meal Flour
Wild Einkorn (Triticum boeotictim)
Wild Emmer (Triticum dicoccoides)
 
 
Additional Information to know about a Gluten-Free Diet
 
  • Read all rice and soy beverages to be sure no barley enzymes were used.
  • Sprouted wheat and spelt are not gluten-free
  • Read all lotions, shampoos, conditioners, creams, soaps, toothpastes and cosmetics to be sure they are gluten-free
  • Do not directly lick stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels. Use a sponge or a damp cloth when possible
  • Many prescription and over the counter medicines contain gluten. Check out these websites to be sure your prescription medication is gluten-free: http://homepage.mac.com/sholland/celiac/GFmedlist.pdf, https://www.pfizerpro.com/product_info/chantix_pi_ingredients.jsp 
  • Be sure all spices are gluten free
 
 
 
For some topical gluten may be an issue. At this time science shows that gluten is too large to pass through the skin but some with celiac or gluten intolerance may also have an allergy to topical gluten, like me. Some just choose to avoid gluten in all their products just to be safe. If that is the case for you, here is a list of ingredients to avoid:
 
BARLEY DERIVED INGREDIENTS
AMINO PEPTIDE COMPLEX
BARLEY EXTRACT
HORDEUM VULGARE (BARLEY) EXTRACT
PHYTOSPHINGOSINE EXTRACT
WHEAT DERIVED INGREDIENTS
AMP-ISOSTEAROYL HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
DISODIUM WHEATGERMAMIDO PEG-2 SULFOSUCCINATE
HYDROLYZED WHEAT GLUTEN
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN PG-PROPYL SILANETRIOL
HYDROLYZED WHEAT STARCH
HYDROXYPROPYLTRIMONIUM HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN STEARYLDIMONIUMHYDROXYPROPYL HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN WHEAT AMINO ACIDS
WHEAT BRAN EXTRACT
WHEAT GERM EXTRACT
WHEAT GERM GLYCERIDES
WHEAT GERM OIL
WHEAT GERMAMIDOPROPYLDIMONIUM HYDROXYPROPYL
HYDROLYZED WHEAT PROTEIN
WHEAT PROTEIN
WHEAT (TRITICUM VULGARE) BRAN EXTRACT
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) FLOUR LIPIDS
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) GERM EXTRACT
TRITICUM VULGARE (WHEAT) GERM OIL
OAT DERIVED INGREDIENTS
AVENA SATIVA (OAT) FLOUR
AVENA SATIVA (OAT) KERNEL PROTEIN
OAT (AVENA SATIVA) EXTRACT
OAT BETA GLUCANOAT EXTRACT
OAT FLOUR
SODIUM LAUROYL OAT AMINO ACIDS
 
 
Here is an article I wrote for Inside Cosmeceuticals:
 
Gluten Free Inside and Out
Julie McGinnis, M.S., R.D., certified herbalist
 
Gluten Free Inside and Out
By Julie McGinnis, M.S., R.D., certified herbalist
 
Celiac Disease (CD)/Gluten Intolerance (GI) affects 1 out of 133 Americans, or about 3 million people. This autoimmune disorder is genetic and leaves one unable to digest gluten properly. The result of this autoimmune disorder is damage and flattening to the villi that are responsible for absorption of nutrients.  Those with CD have more advanced damage to their intestine as compared to those with GI, however, both are unable to tolerate gluten and have resulting health conditions. Amongst this community (and others without these conditions) there are some that also have what is called an IgE antibody response to gluten. This reaction is an allergy that causes the skin to flare in ways such as redness, swelling, acne or rashes. The amount of those with both intolerances to gluten in the gut and on the skin is unknown but it appears more are popping up daily. Gluten is a protein found in barley, rye, oats, wheat and spelt. Oats are gluten free but research has shown that there is so much cross contamination with processing in the same places that wheat is processed that they test high for gluten. However, now gluten free oats are available that are grown and processed apart from wheat. Exposure to gluten for someone with CD/GI can cause a myriad of health conditions such as lymphomas, osteoporosis anemia and migraines. Along with these health conditions some, but not all, experience digestive problems; like gas, bloating, constipation or diarrhea. For a full list of health conditions for those with CD/GI, please visit www.theglutenfreegirl.com. At this time, the only treatment for CD/GI is to avoid gluten completely.
 
However, many are still confused if this means avoidance of gluten in their bath and beauty products. Some experts say that the protein in gluten is too large to permeate the skin and be absorbed. However, at this time, there are no studies on the affects of topical gluten exposure, and according to Dr. Kenneth Fine, M.D. of Enterolabs, "Gluten sensitivity is a systemic immune reaction to gluten anywhere in the body, not just that entering the body via the gut. Therefore, topically applied lotions, creams, shampoos, etc. containing gluten would indeed provide a source of gluten to the body, and we therefore recommend all such products be discontinued for optimal health." As a practitioner who is also gluten intolerant, I have had topical skin reactions and so have the customers I see on a daily basis. We are amongst the community that has both intestinal reactions from the immune system called IgG antibody response and external reactions from the immune system called IgE antibody response. For those that do not have skin reactions the decision to avoid gluten in their products is really a personal one and many still do, particularly with products for the eyes and mouth. Body care products that are ingestible by nature of placement on the body might be given extra attention. Steve Shriver from Eco Lips (whose entire line is gluten-free) comments, “Those with CD/GI, at the very least, should use balms that are gluten free because anything applied to the lips can easily be ingested and cause the same problems as eating gluten.”
 
The trend does seem to be changing, and many manufacturers are choosing to use gluten-free ingredients. According to Autumn Blum, CEO and cosmetic chemist for Organix-South, “Modern research continues to prove that some cosmetic ingredients ARE absorbed through the skin and the eye and mouth areas are particularly susceptible. Therefore, it makes sense for those with celiac disease or other gluten intolerance to search out gluten free cosmetics and body care products. With more and more of our customers inquiring about gluten-free, we began formulating our new products to meet this need. Through the process, we decided to convert our entire product line to gluten free.” As more CD/GI is diagnosed some may also realize they have an allergy to topical gluten as well. The demand for gluten free products will increase and labeling and certification will be in higher demand.
 
According to Bettina Bond, National Educator for Surya Brasil, “Health and beauty products often contain avena sativa (oat), hydrolyzed wheat, hydrolyzed proteins, barley derived ingredients, triticum vulgare (wheat), vitamin E and wheat germ as ingredients. Since vitamin E is often sourced from wheat germ, this ingredient is being listed as one to be avoided in the CD/GI community. Surya Brasil’s products use gluten free ingredients like rice protein, amaranth and brazil nut oil in place of the commonly used gluten containing ingredients.” These gluten containing ingredients can be found in toothpaste, shampoo, conditioner, moisturizers, soaps, make-up, etc. Customers spend a lot of time reading through long lists of ingredients to figure out if there is gluten in the product. In service to this growing need, cosmetic companies could help consumers by investing in gluten free certification. This way if the certification seal is on the bottle no further reading of ingredients is necessary. The company providing this service is the Gluten Free Certification Organization found at www.GFCO.org . This company audits and tests the facility where the products are made and in order to gain certification the finished product must have 10 ppm or less gluten. Certifying will not only give consumers peace of mind but it can save them time. Some companies that have not gone through the certification process have either issued statements or print on their products that they are gluten-free.
 
As diagnosis and awareness continue to rise for CD/GI, the gluten-free industry is set to reach $2.6 billion in sales by 2010. These sales will be not only for gluten-free products that are eaten but for oral health and beauty products as well. Those with CD/GI may or may not have a skin allergy to gluten but many choose to avoid these products as well. Those with CD/GI are very in touch with their condition and most will know if topical gluten containing products should be eliminated from their lives.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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